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Yes – I work personally and professionally to place Veterans into Corporate America by educating employers and coaching Veterans in their transition process… and I’m telling you NOT to hire that Veteran.  I will explain.

The momentum continues to build as I work to help Veterans transition and encourage Employers to take advantage of the amazing talents Veterans offer!  When I present to a company I am all passion and rightfully so.  To ensure my message is not clouded by any elephants I need to address the issue of the the Vets that don’t provide value.  There is nothing patriotic about keeping a Veteran that subtracts value from your organization – so don’t.

Jack Welch made a practice of releasing the bottom 10% of his company annually; Jim Collins (in his award winning book, “Good to Great”) will tell you that “Great” companies will make sure the right people are on the bus and the wrong people are kicked off the bus. No organization is 100% effective and I won’t preach that U.S. Military Vets are any different. I WILL tell you that there are far too many outstandingly qualified and high performing Veterans out there that you should never be holding onto a less than ABOVE-average performing Veteran out of “Patriotic Duty”. All they do is give a poor and inaccurate representation of Veterans in the work force.

There is much to be said about how to spot accurate flags to weed out the “bottom 10%” early in the process; more so than will be written here today. There are 3 primary reasons a Veteran is underperforming.

1. The Veteran is poorly matched to their job role (this can happen anywhere, with any employee).

2. The Manager is weak. Yes, bluntly put – if the manager is not willing or able to identify sub-par performance and demand better, the Veteran will have a false sense of acceptable expectations (as would any employee). Veterans are diligent and will sacrifice for a greater goal – give them their goal!

3. The Veteran is in the “bottom 10%”. Get rid of him. Don’t let that Vet ruin it for other Vets. Of course as with any employee, due diligence should be administered in ensuring this is the problem before making a decision to terminate.

Now that we have the elephant addressed, stay tuned as I start my next series of articles on the profiles of Veterans and how each fit into and add above-average value to your organization!

Posted on the go from my Droid RAZR, technology is our friend!

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